6th & 7th December 2018
Conference Suite Paragon House, Brentford Campus, University of West London, UK

Implementing and managing the non-clinical psychosocial model of person centered community integrated care: barriers, tools and opportunities within our communities

Fifth Annual Conference and Awards Ceremony of the European Society for Person Centered Healthcare (ESPCH5) http://pchealthcare.org.uk/conferences/2018/12/fifth-annual-conference-and-awards-ceremony-european-society-person-centered-hea

The psychosocial components of being, once considered clinically irrelevant, are recognised as having material impact on physical and mental well-being. Issues of social vulnerability, loneliness, social networks and community structure are slowly being drawn into the health care model.
How we engage at a meaningful level and how we address the wider dimensions of psychosocial health is not without problem of definition, organisation, funding, implementation and frame.

Fully addressing the psychosocial lies not just in meaningful conversation, or in the provision of interests and activities that satiate the hedonistic need. Just as important is the eudaimonic dimension, the opportunity for personal growth and meaning. Tying all these together requires rich social and community habitats that afford opportunities to generate vital social and community networks. Indeed, certain dynamics of social network theory necessitate meaningful interaction at the clinical level.

In “The Meaning of Me®”: A Canadian blueprint for addressing the complex whole that is the person at the centre of the community-based homecare services model”, Teasdale et al discuss a working framework for addressing the non-clinical psychosocial for those living in place with complex care needs. Briefly, the model starts with knowing the person and meaningful conversation, then to opportunities for engaging in activities and interests, and then to a wider supporting community architecture.

In this talk we extend the model and address inter alia issues of holistic awareness, of organisation, of funding, of social prescribing and social networks, of the need to incorporate social and community objectives into the theory of the firm and of the risks of over institutionalisation of solutions. We also address how social and community networks could be enhanced via community mapping and how technology and cross sector collaboration could be used to address the psychosocial within the complex universe of diverse health care needs and personal preference.


November 15th, 2018
Julius Banquet Centre

Personhood, Community, Perspectives & Interactions – Mapping, Creativity & Collaboration

Ontario’s Premier Seniors Conference & Information Fair

http://ocsco.ca/signature-events


August 8th-10th, 2018
Toronto

Introducing an Internationally Recognized Person Centered, Community Integrated Model of Home Care

International Federation on Ageing 14th Global Conference

Home care is one of the furthest points along the chain of care that you can get for the older adult. It occupies critical space in the care continuum, dominating large parts of the person’s space and time. The home is especially relevant to aging in place dynamics and the highly important dimensions of the mind and community interaction.

Mosaic’s blue print for Person Centered Care extends the notion that home care based services should be implemented collaboratively with the individual and their families to one that also embraces the voice and the rich habitat of the mind and the being of the person.

It is one that is also especially sensitive to the importance of community and the person’s place in the community. In this sense the model is one that delivers personal support and medical care along well defined client centered protocols differentiated by a fluid organic relationship core. Not only is the client front and center in the relationship but the care provider itself develops a wider set of integrated relationships with the community.

At a fundamental level, the person centered intervention begins a conversational framework that becomes an interactive journey between all those involved in the care relationship. It differs from other similarly framed interventions paying attention to, as Daniel Kahneman would say, the remembering self and the experiencing self: to remember, to create to positive experience.  The framework is sensitive to the need for creative space and loop backs to the person’s mental and physical interests and community interaction.

Much of the inspiration for the development of the model came from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation report, A Better Life-What Older People with High Support Needs Value (Jeanne Katz et al, 2011).

The talk will discuss how the service model is framed and delivered, how it interacts with the person being cared for and the supports, services and exigencies of wider community engagement. As the growing literature confirms, a failure to embrace the many inputs that impact both physical and mental well being is costly for society as a whole and, at times, devastating for the individual.

Two immediate public policy implications arise from our model. The first is that it is designed to be delivered as a cost effective, stand alone, component at a “global system level”, which means that serving the higher level dimensions of personhood could become a standard component of public sector healthcare delivery. The second relates to the design of an interface between for profit and not for profit elements and activities within the community and the person in care to facilitate resource efficient “integration”; this we believe is critical to the evolution of an integrated community and the ability to age “fully” in place.


April 30th & May 1st, 2018
Toronto

Age-Friendly – Nice Theme Team Sessions

Transitions Aging Across the Life Course

13th Annual Knowledge Exchange
NICE – National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly
http://www.nicenet.ca/

Jane Teasdale

AGE-FRIENDLY

Jane Teasdale, Mosaic

​Jane Teasdale is the joint owner and Director of Business Development and Community Relations of Mosaic Home Care & Community Resource Centres. Ms. Teasdale is dedicated towards developing awareness of home and health care issues in the community, and to developing relations between healthcare professionals, home care providers, not-for-profit agencies and other important service providers that are needed to provide the wider levels of support often required by those in need in the community. Ms. Teasdale is also co-chair of the North York Elder Abuse Network, a diverse group of North York community service partners committed to promoting awareness of elder abuse and providing educational and training opportunities supported by The Ontario Network for Prevention Against Elder Abuse.

​”The Role of Community Based Home Care for Aging in Place: An Age-Friendly Community Perspective”

In this session, Ms. Teasdale will focus on the importance of a more complete model of care that looks to maintain the journey of discovery that is life, and the need to allow an individual’s character, vitality, and life contributions to continue to shine through the caregiving relationship. Specifically, she will speak on the homecare services model of the future where individuals, their families, and their communities need to be put at the centre of the continuum of care. Ms. Teasdale will also present on the service structures and systems that should be developed in order to meet different life and lifestyle needs of a diverse aging population.


Friday Feb. 16th, 2018
Toronto

When It Matters Most: Person Centered Care at The End of Life for Persons Living with Dementia – Jane Teasdale

Alzheimer Society Toronto; A Panel Discussion for Alzheimer Society Toronto’s Dementia Network

Jane Teasdale speaking at Alzheimer Society event

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26 to 28 October 2017
London, UK Westminster Cathedral Hall

“The Meaning of Me®”: A Canadian blue print for addressing the complex whole that is the person at the centre of the community based home care services model.”

European Society For Person Centered Healthcare, 4th Annual Conference

Mosaic’s blue print for Person Centred Care extends the notion that care based services should be implemented collaboratively with the individual and their families to one that also embraces the voice and the rich habitat of the mind and the being of the person being cared for.  It is one that is also especially sensitive to the importance of community, the person’s place in the community and the wider dynamic that encompasses a person’s many dimensions of being.  In this sense the model is one that delivers personal support and medical care along well defined client centered protocols differentiated by a fluid organic relationship core Not only is the client front and centre in the relationship but the care provider itself develops a wider set of relationships with the community.

At a fundamental level, the “Meaning of Me” is a conversational framework that becomes an interactive journey between all those involved in the care relationship.  It differs in many meaningful respects from other similarly framed interventions paying attention to, as Daniel Kahneman would say, the remembering self and the experiencing self: to remember, to create to positive experience. It is also a framework very much aware of the dynamics of interaction and the processes required to provide the necessary creative space and loop back to the client.  At one level, it is simple and easy to execute, but it is through the doors that it opens that the potential lies.

Much of the inspiration for the development of the model came from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation report, A Better Life-What Older People with High Support Needs Value (Jeanne Katz et al, 2011).

The talk will discuss how the service model is framed and delivered, how it interacts with the person being cared for and how an organisation can tailor specific services that interact with the greater focus on the person.  It will also address key organisational platforms needed to deliver care within the complex whole.  The talk will also address issues of costs and funding for such services as barriers to the development of holistic services and how these could possibly be addressed.

The community based model for care that places the individual front and centre in the relationship, while also preserving the necessary duality of professionalism and the personal is a complex one. As the growing literature and, indeed, much of the empirical work confirms, a failure to embrace the many inputs that impact both physical and mental well-being is expensive not just financially but costly for society as a whole, and at times devastating for the individual.

Mosaic presented on October 20th, 2016 for the Senior Citizen’s Organization Symposium “Overcoming Loneliness & Social Isolation:  How Mosaic’s Model of Care helps meet identified social and emotional needs of older adults within its care Celebrating Best Community Practices”

“Overcoming Loneliness and Social Isolation: Celebrating Best Community Practices”: How Mosaic’s model of care helps meet identified social and emotional needs of older adults within its care.”

Nathalie and Jane Gold Award

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October 20th, 2016
Toronto

How Mosaic’s Model of Care helps meet identified social and emotional needs of older adults its care celebrating best Community Practices”

Ontario Society of Senior Citizens Organizations: Overcoming Loneliness of Social Isolation